Feijoa sellowiana

Feijoa sellowiana

Feijoa sellowiana

The common name for this plant is Pineapple Guava.
Often considered by the timid too tender for us here in the Willamette Valley of Oregon, this lovely shrub has flourished through our worst winters–OK that’s a lie: one winter it lost its leaves and died back a little, but normally it looks like it does today (pic in mid December), a beautiful soft evergreen shrub. ┬áIn early summer it flowers with fleshy edible sweet flowers (not very filling tho) and in the winter the edible fruits taste like citrus pears. At the moment the only size we have is field grown: $75.00.

Size: Field grownPrice: $75.00

Wintersweet (Chimonanthus praecox)

Wintersweet (Chimonanthus praecox)

Wintersweet (Chimonanthus praecox)

First of all, I took this pic yesterday, December 27 so you see this Wintersweet is in full flower, and more important, it is in full fragrance; so as I go out my office door (just to the left of the window that you see there), I feel the sweetness to my toes. This is a pretty straggly large shrub (8′), but it is fairly well contained, so it is not a nuisance; and even if it were, it’s winter offering would make up for it. zone 6

Size: 1 gallonPrice: $25.00

Weeping Pea Shrub (Caragana arborescens) Walker

Weeping Pea Shrub (Caragana arborescens)

Weeping Pea Shrub (Caragana arborescens)

This cutleaf weeping Siberian pea-shrub is about as hardy as any plant I grow. It is covered with small yellow flowers in the spring. It is a fine unusual addition to a small garden. These are grafted at about 3′ and will never get much taller than that. zone 3

Size: 2 gallonPrice: $50.00

Swedish Columnar Aspen (Populus tremula ‘Erecta’)

Swedish Columnar Aspen (Populus tremula 'Erecta')

Swedish Columnar Aspen (Populus tremula 'Erecta')

Thirty years ago, new to the Northwest, I spent a weekend in the mountains of central Oregon and wondered why I was always hearing a stream trickle by when there was no water at all. It was the breeze in the leaves of Quaking Aspen when there was no wind to speak of. It was a distinctive and restful sound, and I decided I wanted to grow that tree in my nursery. I did for a while, but there was a big problem. In the fall, the deer (blasted young bucks) barked them all so I gave up. But a few years ago I saw the columnar form and was so taken with it, I decided to try again. Also to offer the tree in a small size. Totally hardy (zone 3) and stunning fall color. I’m excited. Photo thanks to the incomparable Jackie Becker.

Size: 1 galPrice: $25.00

Sourwood (Oxydendrum arboreum)

Sourwood (Oxydendrum arboreum)

Sourwood (Oxydendrum arboreum)

Oxydendrum is an underused plant, to say the least. This is a small to medium tree which is suitable for large planters or small gardens. The drooping fragrant flower panicles in the summer veil the tree in white and the flowers persist after the foliage turns in the fall; the scarlet fall color is unsurpassed. The tree is listed as zone 5 but there is one flowering in Maine.

Size: 1 gallonPrice: $25.00
Size: 2 gallonPrice: $0.00